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Tomorrow’s lunar eclipse

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Oct 7, 2014

Don’t miss the lunar eclipse tomorrow morning! Here’s what it should look like about 15 minutes before it first reaches its total phase. The total phase should be about 4:25am to 5:25am Dallas time, and the moon will still be partially eclipsed as it fades into the Sunrise about 6:25am. For those of you on the West Coast it will be a bit more challenging for your sleep schedule, with the total phase being about 2:25 to 3:30am. If you’re content to just see a partial eclipse, it will still be half eclipsed at 4am.

Being a Sabbatical/Shemitah year right now, the last year of an ongoing seven-year cycle on the Hebrew calendar, it feels significant to me that we will also find both Hebrew feast times this year marked by lunar eclipses. Tomorrow morning is the first one, near the Feast of Tabernacles, and in about 6 months will be the second one, near the Feast of Passover. Such a marking of a Sabbatical year doesn’t often happen. Have there been other such occurrences in history? That will be worth investigating. I’ll let you know if I find any interesting answers.

So, what does this marked Sabbatical year mean? A Sabbatical year is a time when the Father wants His people to rest in dependence on Him, in confidence that He will provide for their needs. The Sabbatical year’s being marked like this could mean a number of things – but one possible answer is simply that these signs have been placed in the heavens to confirm to His people, currently scattered on the far sides of the globe, that “Yes, this is indeed the Sabbatical year I’ve given you to follow.” “Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.” (Matt 11:28)

Let’s be in prayer for the people of Israel, that the Father will draw more and more of them to Himself, that they might truly know Him, resting in His provision, and listening for His guidance. “Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.” (Matt 11:29-30)

Oct 8, 2014

 

Allan: Sorry – my time is actually an hour early. I forgot to account for daylight savings time. What the above picture is showing should be visible an hour later – a little after 5am in Dallas, or a little after 3am on the West Coast.

Note to myself for future reference – When Daylight Savings Time is in effect, Stellarium doesn’t recognize and account for this in its calculations. If I’m using Stellarium to represent a specific time during Daylight Savings Time in the US Central Time Zone, UTC -6, a workaround which seems to produce the correct results is to set Stellarium’s time zone to the US Eastern time zone, UTC -5, while leaving the coordinates of the geographical location set to the actual desired location. A more general rule then would be, if you need to represent Daylight Savings Time, shift the Time Zone one hour to the East from the actual Time Zone of the location being used.

Allan: On the question of Sabbatical years marked in the way that 2014/2015 is marked, with total lunar eclipses at both the fall Tabernacles festival and the spring Passover festival, it turns out to be a bit rarer than I expected. I find only 14 occurrences in the time span from 4100 BC to 3100 AD. The last occurrence before 2014 was the year 1363, and the next one will be the year 3085. It was a bit more regular for the most ancient BC dates, with typically 3 occurrences every 763 years.

The specific details on the results of this search, for the 4100 BC to 3100 AD time span – Sabbatical years marked with total eclipses at both Tabernacles and Passover:

  • 4082 BC (year 21 of a Jubilee period)  also a Mars/Regulus triple conjunction this year; followed the next year by a total eclipse at Tabernacles
  • 3543 BC (year 21 of a Jubilee period)  also a Venus/Jupiter ECC this year; followed at the next Jubilee year (3514 BC) by Jupiter/Regulus triple, Mars/Regulus triple, and total eclipse at Tabernacles
  • 3431 BC (year 35 of a Jubilee period)  also a Jupiter/Regulus triple conjunction this year; followed the next year by a total eclipse at Tabernacles and Venus/Regulus CC
  • 3319 BC (year 49 of a Jubilee period)  followed also the next year, the Jubilee year, by a total eclipse at Tabernacles and Venus/Regulus CC
  • 2780 BC (year 49 of a Jubilee period)  also a Venus/Spica CC this year, followed the next year, the Jubilee year, by a total eclipse at Tabernacles
  • 2017 BC (year 28 of a Jubilee period)  also a Venus/Regulus CC this year; followed the next year by a total eclipse at Tabernacles and a Venus/Spica CC
  • 1709 BC (year 42 of a Jubilee period)  also a Venus/Spica CC this year, preceded the previous year by a total eclipse at Passover and Venus/Regulus CC
  • 1058 BC (year 7 of a Jubilee period)  also a Saturn/Regulus triple conjunction this year; preceded the previous year by a total eclipse at Passover; followed the next year by a total eclipse at Tabernacles and a Jupiter/Spica triple conjunction
  • 946 BC (year 21 of a Jubilee period)  preceded the previous year by a total eclipse at Passover; followed the next year by a total eclipse at Tabernacles and a Venus/Spica CC
  • 360 BC (year 28 of a Jubilee period)  preceded the previous year by a total eclipse at Passover; followed the next year by a total eclipse at Tabernacles, a Jupiter/Regulus triple conjunction, and a Venus/Regulus CC
  • 248 BC (year 42 of a Jubilee period)  also a Venus/Spica CC this year; followed the next year by a total eclipse at Tabernacles, a Mars/Regulus triple conjunction, and a Venus/Regulus CC
  • 1363 AD (year 35 of a Jubilee period)  also a Saturn/Spica double conjunction, Venus/Spica CC, and Venus/Regulus CC this year; preceded the previous year by a total eclipse at Passover; followed the next year by a total eclipse at Tabernacles, a Jupiter/Spica double conjunction, and a Mars/Regulus double conjunction
  • 2014 AD (year 49 of a Jubilee period)  preceded the previous year by a total eclipse at Passover and a Mars/Spica triple conjunction; followed the next year by a total eclipse at Tabernacles and a Mars/Regulus conjunction on Yom Kippur
  • 3085 AD (year 42 of a Jubilee period)  also a Venus/Regulus CC this year; preceded the previous year by a total eclipse at Passover

6/29/2017 Edit: The Jubilee accounting for these findings was initially based on a 12-year or 61-year gap in the counting of years for Sabbatical/Jubilee purposes during the Babylonian exile, consistent with the historically known pre-exile Jubilee/Sabbatical year system and the post-exile Sabbatical year system followed by the present day nation of Israel, and having been extended to propose a possible placement of post-exile Jubilees. The rationale for this Jubilee placement was based primarily on astronomical patterns, discussed at “Restoring the Timetable of Sabbath and Jubilee Years.” However, this has now been adjusted to reflect a 40-year gap in counting during the Babylonian exile. This too is consistent with the post-exile Sabbatical year system followed by the nation of Israel, and seems to produce a better-attested Jubilee placement than that which was previously proposed, restarting the count 40 years after Ezekiel’s Jubilee, in 534/533 BC, aligning with a number of cues over the last several hundred years, particularly in 1917/1918 and 1966/1967, and resulting in the 2014/2015 Sabbatical year being more specially marked, as the very last Sabbatical of a Jubilee cycle.

This search doesn’t point us to those years such as 1948 and 1967 which have been highlighted by the mainstream blood moon research, but it’s not in disagreement with those results. What we’re seeing in 2014 is a convergence of two patterns – the Sabbath year-oriented pattern described here, and also a pattern highlighting the relationship of lunar eclipses to the conjunctions of Mars with Regulus and Spica. In 1948 what we had was a Mars/Regulus triple conjunction marking Israel’s restoration as a nation, followed by a set of lunar eclipses. In 1967 what we had was a Mars/Spica triple conjunction marking the restoration of Jerusalem and some additional areas of land to the nation of Israel, followed by a set of lunar eclipses. In 2014 what we have is a second Mars/Spica triple conjunction, more complete than the first one in 1967, followed this time by a set of lunar eclipses which also highlight the Sabbatical year.

The Mars/Regulus and Mars/Spica conjunctions are an important part of the pattern not always mentioned by the mainstream blood moon researchers. These conjunctions more closely identify the actual dates of events, while the lunar eclipses lag behind them by a year or so, most likely with the intention of telling God’s people to get up and go, in response to these things that have happened. This hasn’t yet been fully written up, but needs to be.

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